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Write for Rights

Hoops for Hearts

 

Highlights:

  • Eat some delicious food and volunteer!
  • Anyone can participate as long as you have a flier.
  • The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life

“We thought what better way to give back to the community than putting on a fundraising event for the American Cancer Society,” Crookston said.

For my Journalism 312 class we are in charge of putting on a public relations campaign for any local company or organization of our choice and a group of us decided on fundraising for The American Cancer Society.

The event will be held at California Pizza Kitchen, located on Marsh Street in San Luis Obispo. The fundraiser is scheduled for Tuesday November 16, from 11am-10pm.

When I asked one of the PR team members why she chose to work with the American Cancer Society on this event, second year Hasy Crookston, responded, “I volunteered for relay for the first time last year to support my step fathers fight against lung cancer. He ended up passing away the weekend of Relay and I was unable to attend. When I discovered we had to put on a PR event for my Journalism class I couldn’t think of a better event to do than a fundraiser for relay.”

If any table presents the flier, twenty percent of the bill goes directly to the American Cancer Society. Each person attending the event must present a flier, which can be printed off the official event invitation Facebook page, in order for the American Cancer Society to receive the profits.

“I’m really excited CPK is giving us this opportunity to raise money for an amazing organization,” Mills said

Fliers will also be passed out around the Cal Poly campus and throughout the community before the actual event. You can also find a link to the flier here.

“We thought what better way to give back to the community than putting on a fundraising event for the American Cancer Society,” Crookston said.

Not only is the event a great cause, but what better way to give back to the community and fight against a disease that affects us all in one way or another then going out to dinner.

“This Relay fundraiser is a way for me to continue to honor my stepfather because the effects of cancer affect me daily,” Crookston said.

Although the event was started for a class, it turned into something much more. Each of the members of the PR team no longer looks as this event as a grade for a journalism class. By working so closely with this event and planning every detail, it has become much more than that. As a member myself, we are all about getting as many people as we can to participate to raise as much money as we can for this organization.

Second year journalism major, Lindsey Mills, who is also apart of the PR team said, “I’m really excited CPK is giving us this opportunity to raise money for an amazing organization.”

Highlights:

  • Volunteering comes in all shapes and sizes.
  • Fundraising can be something you actually LOVE to do.
  • Raising money for cardiac care.
Hoops for Hearts

"It's great to get people from so many different houses at one place having fun and contributing to a great cause. Couldn't really ask for more," Zendejas said.

All of the people participating and the coaches on the sideline had a great time at this event,” Zendejas said.

Playing a quick game of basketball may not seem like the most common way to contribute to a any cause but the good news is, fundraising comes in all forms!

Hoops for hearts was an event put on by The Alpha Phi Foundation, which supports cardiac care and research.

Second year biological sciences major, Kelsey Quinlan, also a participant in the event, explains, “we asked seven fraternities to each pay one hundred and fifity dollars to participate, which includes a free t-shirt. Then 5 members from each fraternity became a team and played against other teams.”

Hoops for Hearts

"Not only did all of the fraternities show up to support a great cause but they competed against each other and had great sportsmanship," McDermott said.

Girls from the sorority split up and helped coach the small teams. They also ended helping out and organzing anything else that came up.

“All of the people participating and the coaches on the sideline had a great time at this event. We also raised a good amount of money, so I would definitely say that the event was successful as a whole,” Quinlan said.

The money raised from the event came to be about about twelve hundred dollars.

When asked about the success of the event, fourth year communications studies major and coordinator, Koryna Zendejas, said “The games ran efficiently and all teams showed up. There was a great turn out of girls and support and the only slight problem there was was the wind but the fraternity men were great sports about it and did not let it hurt their game.”

Delta Chi came out on top with Alpha Gamma Rho coming in at second place.

Second year Lilly Mcdermott, who came out to watch and show her support said, “I like watching the teams play.  I think it was also really fun how members of our sorority were the coaches of the different fraternity basketball teams.  The coaches made sure to keep their spirits up and cheer them on.”

Hoops for Hearts

"My favorite part of this process was how everyone came together to participate and make the event successful," Quinlan said.

Overall, the success of the event was better than expected and due to such a high turnout, The Alpha Phi Foundation plans on making this fundraiser a yearly affair.

Though there was no real prize for the winner of the tournament, Delta Chi won a trophy and some bragging rights, which is better than any real prize if you ask me.

Here are some great ways to get involved  for the month of November. Each map has a location plotted with a description of what that event entails. Hope you all enjoy!

A Love for Animals

Cooking for a Cause

Highlights:

-Nutrition majors help cook and serve food to people living with AIDS in San Luis Obispo.

The AIDS Support Network

-19th Annual Walk for Life, Nov. 6th

Nutrition majors prepare food for people living with AIDS in SLO

It’s not everyday that you hear about people living with HIV and AIDS in an area near you, but the truth is, people are suffering and students at Cal Poly are reaching out and helping.

Cal Poly’s nutrition club stepped in and decided to prepare meals for patients suffering from HIV and AIDS in honor of Make a Difference Day.

Although the event was kept a little under wraps due to the confidentiality of the AIDS patients, it was still a successful event, according to Nutrition major and second year Cal Poly student Jennifer Grise.

Nutritional salads are individually bagged for each patient.

Jennifer is apart of Cal Poly’s nutrition club and heard about volunteering for this event through an e-mail circulated by the club.

Members of the nutrition club cooked Enchiladas, prepared salads, and made Rice Krispie Treats as a dessert. The meals were then individually bagged, so that any person suffering from AIDS in the San Luis Obispo community could stop by and grab a meal.

“Preparing food for those suffering from AIDS in our community was an amazing opportunity,” Grise said.

Though many are unaware of those affected by HIV and AIDS within the San Luis Obispo community, there are still ways to show support and get involved.

Another Nutrition major and second year Cal Poly student who attended the event, Jordan Young said, “Preparing food is a passion of mine, I was able to take my passion and turn it into a way to help others. It’s an awesome feeling.”

Some upcoming events for the San Luis Obispo County AIDS Support Network include the 19th Annual Walk for Life event on November 6. The event is located at Santa Rosa Park and is an opportunity to raise “much-needed dollars for services,” according to the official ASN website.

Funds have been greatly cut within the past year and this event is an opportunity to obtain the money needed to run a successful and thriving program.

Getting involved and preparing nutritional meals for those suffering is just one way that Cal Poly students can get involved.

When asked what advice she would give for students looking to get involved in any kind of volunteer work, Grise said, “Just do what you love and as long as you are helping people it doesn’t matter what it takes, you feel great after.”

Volunteers prepare Enchiladas for HIV and AIDS patients.

Nike Women’s Marathon

 

Who: Brittany Stuart, Jackie Gragnola, Alivia LeVeque

What: Nike Women’s Marathon 2010

When: October 17, 2010

Where: San Francisco, CA

Why: A race to benefit the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society

 

Women's Marathon

"It was such a great experience seeing everyone come out to support a good cause," Stuart said.

Brittany Stuart

Q: What made you decide to participate in this half marathon?

I decided to participate because i love to run and a group of my sorority sisters were signing up as well, so we decided to run it together!

Q: What was your favorite part about this whole experience?

My favorite part was the actual event. It was such an awesome experience to be able to run with 24,000 women and it was all for a great cause.

Q: What was your least favorite part?
Mile 6-9. It was mostly all uphill.

Q: How do you think you contributed to the good cause by running in this race?

I showed my support by running, and the money i paid towards the race all goes to a great cause.

Q: Do you think you will do one again? And if so why?

I will definitely do another one, this is only the beginning. It was such a great experience seeing everyone come out to support a good cause and it was wonderful to be apart of it all. It is a small way that you can make a difference.

"My favorite part was the kickoff and dancing as we started the race," Gragnola said.

Jackie Gragnola

Q: What made you decide to participate in this half marathon?

I participated in the Nike Women’s Marathon as a sophomore in highschool and this year, one of my sorority sisters asked me to go with her with a discount for college students.  I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to do it again!

Q: What was your favorite part about this whole experience?

There were so many parts! I loved getting to hang out in San Francisco with my sisters and bond with them while doing the race.  My favorite part was the kickoff and dancing as we started the race.  Everyone was so pumped and energetic and the love of health and fitness radiated from the crowd, which made it a really fun start!

Q: What was your least favorite part?
It rained.  Right during the last two miles, but the cold really put a damper on the finish.

Q: How do you think you contributed to the good cause by running in this race?

I know that running in the race made a difference because the collective action by all of the participants can go toward finding treatments and possibly a cure for these diseases.  Many people in the race wore shirts dedicated to family members and friends who were diagnosed.  The messages they promoted touched me and made me grateful for all that I have and don’t always take advantage of.

Q: Do you think you will do one again? and if so why?

Absolutely.  I will definitely be doing this race again every year that I possibly can.  It not only sends money toward a great cause, but it is a fun event promoting a healthy life, something that is often lost in society today.  It is an event that I want to continue doing for as long as I can!

"I would encourage anyone to do it because it is such a wonderful race and it means more when you are helping people and accomplishing the race with people who you love," LeVeque said.

Alivia LeVeque

Q: What made you decide to participate in this half marathon?

I decided to participate in the half marathon because my sorority sisters in Chi Omega decided that we should all participate in the event because it is such an accomplishment to finish.

Q: What was your favorite part about this whole experience?
My favorite part about my experience was hanging out with my friends and actually finishing! It was such an amazing experience and at the end it was very emotional when you finish such an intense task. I enjoyed every minute of it, especially since I got to tour the city of San Francisco in the meantime.

Q: What was your least favorite part?
Honestly, I didn’t have a least favorite part! I know that is probably hard to believe or sound cliche, but honestly it was such an inspirational race because it we all ran for a cause; to help beat leukemia. And my father actually lost his struggle with multiple myeloma recently and I felt as though I was running for him and to help others who were struggling with cancer.

Q: How do you think you contributed to the good cause by running in this race?

I think that I contributed to the cause by actually running in the race, because if nobody did it then there wouldn’t be a fundraiser like this to help leukemia. As I was running in the race I read signs of people who have either struggled with leukemia or who were currently struggling and I felt that because of me I was helping a cause, even though I am only one person.

Q: Do you think you will do one again? And if so why?

Of course I would do it, I would encourage anyone to do it because it is such a wonderful race and it means more when you are helping people and accomplishing the race with people who you love. I run to be healthy, and that is exactly how I felt afterwards.

Run to Remember

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Run to Remember, posted with vodpod

“I’m volunteering in a first grade Spanish class and I love to be able to practice my spanish with them because they’re so funny!” Chrissy Berry said, a modern languages and literature major.

So let’s be realistic, sometimes volunteer work is “required” and for most people, that isn’t always a pleasant idea.

After talking to a couple Cal Poly students who were required to volunteer in order to receive credit for a Spanish class, my perspective on “required” volunteer work changed.

Pacheco Elementary School located in San Luis Obispo is where all the students I talked to volunteered. Each student had to complete a total of 10 hours and went once a week for 2 quarters.

Chris Marlin

"Just actually connecting with the kids and learning while I’m teaching them was not only beneficial to the kids but also to me,” Marlin said.

Second year modern languages and literatures major, Christopher Marlin, tutored a young boy named Carols.

Christopher helped Carlos and other students in the classroom with math and English language development homework, while also working in the classroom.

“Just actually connecting with the kids and learning while I’m teaching them was not only beneficial to the kids but also to me,” Marlin said.

I also talked to another second year modern languages and literature major, Kelly Phillips about her experience.

"You'll surprise yourself with how much you will learn about yourself, and about others," Phillips said.

Photo: Courtesy of Nicole Vose

“My favorite part was definitely the interaction with the elementary school students. I went on a weekly basis, so I was able to build casual but quality relationships with the kids as we went over homework problems or laughed about a funny joke they heard on the playground,” Phillips said.

As the volunteer work was required, many of the students I talked to had positive feedback.

Working in San Luis Obispo’s community and with the children of the community was something new for each of the students involved it also helped them gain a broader prospective of the city as a whole which each of them expressed.

“The interaction I got to experience was not one that most college students ever get,” Phillips said.

When asked what advice she would give to someone who is trying to volunteer, Phillips replied with this optimistic outlook.

“Just do it. Get out there and try new things. You’ll never know who you’ll meet or who you will bless by just being a part of their life for as little as an hour, or as much as those 2 quarters. Volunteering is a perfect way to be challenged and to to be a part of something bigger.”